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Specialising in Psychoanalytic Psychotherapy for 2 to 25 year olds.

Child Psychotherapy
Child Psychotherapy

How does it work?

Younger children might be encouraged to play during a session, whilst older children might draw or paint. Such activities help explore difficulties it might not be possible to speak about. These will often be expressed in problematic peer or family relationships, worrying behaviours, phobias, anxieties, unexplained physical pains, school issues or low mood. As the therapeutic relationship develops the psychotherapist is able to work through the issues and help the child make sense of them and their experience, developing their individuality and potential. This supports the child in processing fears and anxieties, putting them into words, understanding and new ways forward. As a result, they are likely to feel less anxious, more able to learn and are better equipped to sustain friendships. Improvements in family relationships, as well as with professionals such as teachers, can also follow. For more on how this works please click here.

Adolescent Psychotherapy
Adolescent Psychotherapy

How does it work?

Sessions will involve talking, although every person is different and sometimes activities like drawing may prove helpful. Adolescent Psychotherapists are trained to help young people explore difficulties that are often not understood, or hard to put into words - often appearing as behaviours such as self harm or emotional states such depression and anxiety. The psychotherapist is trained to help make sense of why these behaviours and feelings are happening. This can support the young person in processing and understanding the issue, which in turn can stop or reduce the troubling feelings and behaviours, helping them develop their individuality and potential, increasing a sense of wellbeing, and promoting improvements in personal relationships. For more on how this works please click here.

Young Adult Psychotherapy
Young Adult Psychotherapy

How does it work?

Child and Adolescent Psychotherapists work with young adults up to the age of 25. Work can take place face to face or online - or where useful, such as when time is spent at university, through a mixture of face to face and online. Young adulthood can be a particularly challenging time, full of difficult decisions, choices and major life transitions.

Psychotherapists are trained to help explore difficulties that are often not understood, or hard to put into words - often appearing as behaviours such as self harm or emotional states such depression and anxiety. The psychotherapist is trained to help make sense of why these behaviours and feelings are happening which can support the young person in processing and understanding the issue, which in turn can stop or reduce the troubling feelings and behaviours, helping them develop their individuality and potential, increasing a sense of wellbeing, and promoting improvements in personal relationships. For more on how this works please click here.

Parent Psychotherapy
Parent Psychotherapy

Parent support meetings when a child or young person is in therapy...

 

In many instances, particularly when the therapy is with children under 13, parent support sessions, alongside the child’s therapy are held - usually once or twice a term. The purpose of these sessions is, without encroaching on the child’s privacy, to support the therapy in taking root in the family and the wider environment.

 

These meetings are between the therapist and parent(s) or caregiver(s). They are an opportunity to review the therapy's progress, reflect on any thoughts, feelings or issues from the parent's point of view, and support the work taking root in the child's environment.

 

Parent therapy meetings when a child or young person is not in therapy...

 

Sometimes a child will not wish to engage in therapy, or a parent may wish to have a confidential space to reflect on difficulties in their family. Support therapy work is an opportunity to combine the therapist's skills, with the parent’s knowledge and experience, puzzling out confusing or upsetting difficulties occurring in a young person or family, before implementing helpful changes. 

For more on how this works please click here.

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